COOL 3DPRINTING
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COOL 3DPRINTING
All About 3d Printing!
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Sculpteo Shows Us What 3D Printing Is Really Good For: Creating Adapters For Old iPod Docks

Sculpteo Shows Us What 3D Printing Is Really Good For: Creating Adapters For Old iPod Docks | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

Sculpteo, a French 3D printing company, is now offering custom iPhone adapters for older iPod docks, allowing you to add connect to your old Bose, Sony, JBL, and other docks with the new Lightning connector.

 

But the most interesting thing here is that this essentially creates a sort of interstitial hardware. Instead of buying a new dock (or a new baby gate or a new garden parasol) you can buy and print or download and print your own spare parts.

 

This obviously won’t put your local hardware store out of business and 99% of the world won’t buy this Lightning adapter, but the fact that it’s available is very important.  

 

“This story and this adapter is opening a new field of 3D printed spare parts for a lot of different devices.

 

Battery covers, clips, docks, handles … a lot of things can be lost, or become unusable because some other device changed or has been updated,” said Sculpteo founder Clement Moreau.

 

 “We really see 3D Printing here as a way to work smoothly in a moving environment, where big companies have really good reasons to change standards from time to time.”  

 

This is print-on-demand hardware, designed for a very specific purpose with a very specific audience. Because they don’t have to hold inventory, you can essentially offer customized dock adapters.

 

This one is a one-size-fits-all but you could feasibly print new ones for oddly-shaped ports or even adapters for different phones. It makes no sense to make 50,000 of these at a factory in Asia but it makes perfect sense to dump out few hundred to those in need.  

This is hardly an earth-shattering announcement. Oddly enough, as a Makerbot owner I’d actually prefer to be able to download and print my own copy of this adapter rather than buy one for the ridiculous price of $20.

 

I won’t, but still. This announcement does raise a lot of interesting points as to where the hardware business is headed.

 

And when I can breathe new life into old docks with just a tiny piece of plastic I’m a much happier man. And, when someone inevitably creates a free copy of these things, we’ll have to begin asking ourselves what copyright really means in an era when we can print anything at any time, from iPhone dock adapters to guns.

 

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New Balance Show the Process of 3D Printing

New Balance Show the Process of 3D Printing | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 New Balance, ever priding itself on being on the cutting edge of technology, reveals a short and powerful glimpse into the 3D printing process it has begun using to craft some of the parts that go into its performance running models.  

 

 

 

 

Becoming gradually more widespread since its introduction back in 1986, 3D prints are typically produced by taking 3D models designed with Computer Assisted Design (CAD) or modeling software and slicing them into cross-sections.

 

 These slices are then individually printed using layers of liquid, powder or other materials before being fused together to form the completed three-dimensional shape.

 

Other methods, including the one used by New Balance, use lasers to selectively melt the model into a material before removing the excess to reveal the completed form.

 

 

Watch Video :

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXfgihYUDkc&feature=player_embedded

 

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The Joy of 3D Music: Northern Sound Source

The Joy of 3D Music: Northern Sound Source | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it
Ochestration Lessons Northern Sounds Sample Libary Libraries VST, VSTi, DirectX, DXi, AudioUnits, AU Sample Libraries group buy,Music lessons vsti WASAPI Melody em Sample Libraries Keyboard Music Audio Software / Virtual Instruments,Sample libraries...
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iPad app Makies Doll Factory lets you create 3D printable dolls - The Times of India

iPad app Makies Doll Factory lets you create 3D printable dolls - The Times of India | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it
A new iPad app enables budding designers and artists to create their own dolls that are made overnight with 3D printing technology. (iPad app lets you create 3D printable dolls: A new iPad app enables budding designers and artists to create th...
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Inside 3D Printing Conference & Expo in New York 22 - 23/4/2013, attracks roster of expert panelists

Inside 3D Printing Conference & Expo  in New York  22 - 23/4/2013, attracks roster of expert panelists | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

Industry experts, venture capitalists, and professionals in the engineering, technology, manufacturing, culinary, finance, architecture, medical, and fashion industries will meet at Inside 3D Printing Conference & Expo, April 22-23 in NYC.

 

 

 

The two-day event is the first U.S. east coast expo that is fully focused on the 3D printing sector, its applications, and services.

Read more at

 

http://venturebeat.com/2013/03/11/inside-3d-printing-conference-attracts-roster-of-expert-panelists/#2AQok32IC7bfkf7d.99

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NASA's 3D Printed Moon Base

NASA's 3D Printed Moon Base | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

Sounds like the title of a funky children’s story, doesn’t it?

 

 But in fact, it’s actually part of NASA’s plan for building a Lunar base that could one day support inhabitants and make humanity a truly interplanetary species.

 

Watch video :

 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=vwFrCpYavt4

 

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Repairing a TomTom Sat Nav bracket with a 3D printer

Repairing a TomTom Sat Nav bracket with a 3D printer | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

When James Bruton discovered the windscreen sucker mount for a TomTom was broken, he wasn't concerned.

 

The broken parts are critical, a ball joint, as well as the original suction pad are broken and missing.

There is no better way they can be fixed.

 

Bruton has an idea.

He has got an used windscreen mount for a cell phone, so his plan was to make a bridge part to join the ball-socket to the new sucker clip. Bruton measured the broken part, modelled the replacement part in free software AutoCAD 123D Design.

Then he sent the 3D files to his Lulzbot AO-101 3D printer. The part is printed in 3mm ABS with a 0.5mm nozzle and 0.4mm layer height.

The first and second prototypes didn't fit very well but Bruton could just trimmed in the software and printed it out again until he got the perfect replacement part to fit in the ball-socket.

 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quh6xTNJ_iM&feature=player_embedded

 

The original TomTom mount has now a new sucker mount. This is not an example demonstrating the effectiveness of a 3D printer, but well a case showing the future, when cost of 3D printer drops, that we may be able to make many replacement parts quickly and efficiently using this method.

Watch the video below about the whole process of making this piece, including CAD, slicing, and 3D printing.  

 

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Live from Expand: 3D Printing Goes Mainstream

Live from Expand: 3D Printing Goes Mainstream | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Live from Expand: 3D Printing Goes Mainstream Engadget Join us as we speak to Hod Lipson, Professor of Engineering, Cornell University; Max Lobovsky, Co-Founder, FormLabs; and Avi Reichental, President & CEO, 3D Systems.

 

http://www.viddler.com/v/b45de97a

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waelice 3D printed wall lamps by nodesign

waelice 3D printed wall lamps by nodesign | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Design relates to how concepts evolve, how the right technologies or materials are applied to a product, it is about an idea synthesizing with cultural, economic, societal and technological developments, harnessing a variety of techniques translating them into meaningful and useful objects which comfort our senses; aid in relieving stress or difficulties when carrying out certain tasks; enhancing or bettering our lives... it is about empathy. taking this as its theme, the 8th biennale internationale design saint-etienne brings forth a range of concepts as well as realized products which all surround this matter-- one of the most basic and important feelings humans possess-- the formal basis of our relationship with everything around us.

 

http://vimeo.com/35523310

 

 

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Create Lathed 3D Objects in Photoshop CS6 Extended

Create Lathed 3D Objects in Photoshop CS6 Extended | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

In this tutorial, we will show you how to create lathed 3D objects by revolving paths and layers around a fixed axis; a process similar to what you may have seen done using Illustrator’s 3D tools.

 

In the process, we will explain how to create a wine glass, a bottle, and a table top.

 

Let’s get started!

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=263tEd5QB9M

 

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3D scan of Stonehenge reveals hidden ax-head carvings

3D scan of Stonehenge reveals hidden ax-head carvings | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

Stonehenge has long been one of the world's most mysterious monuments. The massive rock circle has given up a few of its secrets to a digital scanning project led by historical-preservation organization English Heritage with an assist from the York Archaeological Trust.

 

The 3D laser-scanning data collected last year has unveiled 72 hidden ax-head carvings in the surface of the stone.

 

Stonehenge was given a complete 3D-scanning treatment, generating 850 gigabytes of data. Archeologists put software from Bentley Systems to work to analyze the data.

 

The resulting data crunching showed 72 carvings depicting Bronze Age tools that had been hiding from the naked eye for thousands of years. Almost all show ax heads, but one is likely a dagger.

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3D printing turns models into reality

3D printing turns models into reality | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

The computer designed particles by starting from a random shape, and then iteratively altered its configuration, at each stage performing a series of simulations that tested how close the performance approximated the stated goal.

 

Once an optimal shape was identified, Miskin then manufactured a large number of copies with the lab’s 3D printer for testing in a viselike squeezing apparatus to verify his algorithm’s predictions.

 

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1KkMQxTM6E&feature=player_embedded

 

 

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3D printing is revolutionizing product development

3D printing is revolutionizing product development | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

Printing in the third dimension

 

New printing technology significantly reduces the time corporations spend prototyping fresh designs and now consumer-level machines could make engineers of us all. An example of how one 3-D printer, the MakerBot Replicator 2, creates a model

 

 

 

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This One-Piece 3D Printed Mini Crossbow Is Adorably Dangerous

This One-Piece 3D Printed Mini Crossbow Is Adorably Dangerous | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

 

 

 



There's a war brewing over the use of 3D printers to make unlicensed guns and other firearms.

 

But for the time being 3D printed weaponry is still a novelty, particularly this fully functional crossbow, which was created in a single printing pass, complete with a cleverly designed flexible working trigger.   

 

The only part that didn't come from a 3D printer is the string stretched across the crossbow's arms, and whatever's used for ammo—whether it's a chopstick or a balsa glider.

 

You can download the plans for the bow on Thingiverse if you have access to a 3D printer and want to make your own, but just be aware that its size is limited to the capacity of your hardware.

 

So don't expect to take down anything larger that a caterpillar with it

 

 

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Gigabot 3D Printer Goes Large

Gigabot 3D Printer Goes Large | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

One of Austin’s newest start-ups: Gigabot with its USP is all about size: A considerable increase compared with other 3D printers at the same level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"How 3D printing changed my life"

"How 3D printing changed my life" | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

John Mackey, the founder of Whole Foods, was in one big exhibit room talking about conscious capitalism.

 

Guy Kawasaki, legendary Silicon Valley marketing whiz, was in another huge space, talking about the future of Google Search with an esteemed Google Fellow.

 

Half an hour before the sessions were due to start, long lines to get into both presentations stretched like lazy serpents throughout the cavernous Austin Convention Center.

 

I skipped them both, and I’m glad I did. My favorite session yet was a 15-minute-long mini-talk by a guy named John Biehler:

 

“How 3D printing changed my life.”

 

Biehler is a hobbyist. He didn’t have a company to pitch or a world-changing ideology to share.

 

 He just wanted to tell his story, how he ordered a kit to build a MakerBot 3D printer a couple of years ago, and became completely obsessed with making stuff.

 

The room he spoke in was small but packed with attentive, appreciative listeners.

 

If there’s anything that can reasonably be discerned as a theme of SXSWi 2013, it’s that hardware is the new software and making real things is the bees knees.

Biehler made a good case for himself as Vancouver’s equivalent of a 3D Printer Johnny Appleseed. He assembled his MakerBot printer himself. He used it make about 60 percent of another 3D printer, supplemented with parts he ordered online. He started selling kits to assemble printers. He helped form a Vancouver 3D printing club.

 

He was a major part of a 3D printing showcase at Vancouver’s first Maker Faire.

The picture that illustrates this post is a slide from his talk.

 

The middle printer was his first MakerBot. The one on the left was partially constructed from parts made by it. The one on the right was made by the one on the left.

 

There is both romance and a little bit of terror in the idea that all you need to make your own 3D printer is another 3D printer. It is the essence of a technology that has escaped control, of people taking creative manufacturing power into their own hands.

 

“I don’t know how many children I have out there in the world,” said Biehler.

“Yeah, but do you still have a girlfriend?” joked a member of the audience.

Luckily, yes.

 

This was homebrew hacker enthusiasm in the flesh. This was a guy telling us how to get an XBOX Kinect off of Craigslist and use it as a 3D scanner to create designs that can be printed.

 

He showed us a picture of a mutant, tripartite Lego piece, and said, “kids just get it. They can make toys with it — GIVE IT TO ME NOW.”

Kids aren’t the only ones who get it. Biehler’s audience was full of grownups, and I got the strong sense that every single one of them was lusting after his or her own 3D printer, and imagining their own kookily useful things to do with them. Biehler makes his own Christmas ornaments with his printer — he showed us a snowflake made out of Darth Vader helmets and got a good laugh.

 

Do-it-yourself hardware hackers are the cresting wave of the Maker movement. They make everyone else look drab.

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3D-Printed Record Plays Like the Real Thing

3D-Printed Record Plays Like the Real Thing | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

 

The nostalgic return to vinyl LP records is endearing, in a way, but no one expects the digital music recording industry to start producing the large discs in mass quantities again.

 

The rise of 3D printing, however, offers the intriguing possibility of printing your own 33RPMs at home.  

 

 

Researcher and Instructables DIY project site team member Amanda Ghassaei has created what may be the world’s first 3D-printed, playable LP records.

 

Ghassaei wrote the code that transforms any audio file into a 3D file that can be created via the high-resolution Objet Connex 500 3D printer.

 

Instructable team member Karen Howard gave us a brief demo at SXSW 2013’s Creator Tent, which was filled with 3D printed projects and other incredibly cool DIY electronics projects and innovations.  

 

Traditional LP’s are pressed in vinyl and are, in fact, a much higher resolution than the final Objet output, which prints the resin-based albums, layer-by-layer in a diagonal fashion. In fact, faint lines that traverse the diameter of the white records are clearly visible.  

 

There are other limitations: the final product is stiffer than vinyl LPs (rather like the really old-school 78 RPMs); the playable portion is only printed on one side; and the bit rate is, at a lowly 1 kHz, one-fourth they typical bit rate found on a standard MP3 file.

 

That said, in our brief hands — and ears — on, the records did play on a standard record player, and the audio is clearly recognizable music.   In time, the resolution and bit rate may improve, which could lead to a boom in home-printed, classic LPs.

 

Our suggestion? Don’t throw out that old turntable just yet.   Get a closer look at the technology in the video above and then let us know in the comments below if you're ready to start spinning tunes again.

 

 

 Listen to the World's First 3D Printed Record

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=h_OwBm9ifWE

 

 

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Making clothes at home with your 3D clothing printer

Making clothes at home with your 3D clothing printer | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How we live by 2050?


Industrial designer Joshua Harris has created a concept that in the future, we could use a clothing printer to manufacture our clothes at home.

 

The ability to create customized objects, such as 3D printing, is increasing in sophistication and marketability. People are becoming more and more aware and comfortable with the concept of printing objects for immediate use.

What if you can use a 3D printer to make your own clothes on demand?

 

To print a piece of clothing, you would first shop from an online marketplace of designs and download the outfit of your selection. In addition you need to buy a cartridge of thread, from a company or a designer.

 

Then you can just print it out on your own 3D printer.

 

The most interesting feature is, when you want something new, you just feed the clothes back into the machine.

 

Clothing can be loaded back where it is broken down into thread and cleaned.

The thread is returned to its cartridge for future use, cutting out the whole shipping and distributing costs and waste.

 

The concept would eliminate the need for closets, washing machines and dryers, thus saving space in the crowded urban environments of the future.

This connected, in-home clothing making device opens up new

opportunities for the clothing industry.

Fashion designers in the future can either sell cartridges of material or sell their designs digitally.

 

 

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Insert Coin semifinalist: Moedls 3D scanner for your phone hands

Insert Coin semifinalist: Moedls 3D scanner for your phone hands | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

Moedls (pronounced moy-dles) inventor John Fehr, being a semifinalist in our Insert Coin competition, is obviously on hand here at Expand. While we were impressed with what we saw from afar, we were really excited to see the low-cost 3D scanner in person.

 

The laser-cut housing for the lasers is delightfully DIY, but it will eventually be replaced with a more polished case.

 

The specially sourced lights, which cast a delightful green glow, are part of what allows the scanner to create surprisingly high-quality results.

 

For the moment they don't actually connect to the companion app on the phone, but Fehr promises to at least consider the possibility if he wins our $20,000 grand prize.

 

There's no need for a direct connection, however. The camera on your smartphone is ultimately what is really doing the heavy lifting here. In conjunction with the aforementioned app of course.

 

The biggest stumbling block when trying to generate these 3D models is stability. To that end, Fehr has built a custom mount for a phone, based around a standard dashboard version.

 

The robust joints minimize movement and the spring-loaded holster allows it to fit practically any device... at least until Samsung's 6.3-inch Note VII hits the market. The belt-driven turntable is also specially sourced -- this is not just a hacked up record player.

 

The prototype is still a little bulky and wobbly, but the final version will be slimmed down, have an aluminum base and ball bearings under the platform to minimize vibrations.

 

The models come together pretty quick under the app, which is still clearly under development and has a view rough edges, though it's certainly functional. In total we're still looking at about $300 in hardware and you'll have an opportunity to throw your weight behind the project on Monday when the Kickstarter launches.

 

Head on after the break to get a quick video tour of the device.

 

Watch Video's

 

 http://www.viddler.com/v/175ca004

 

http://www.viddler.com/v/4e548dba

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The new Unirapid 3, SLA 3D printer with crazy resolution

The new Unirapid 3, SLA 3D printer with crazy resolution | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

A company in Japan called Unirapid Inc. developed a small SLA 3D printer which they claim has the same printing accuracy/quality as the high end industrial 3D printers,

 

 

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5 amazing objects you can create with a 3D printer

5 amazing objects you can create with a 3D printer | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

Why build a house out of bricks and mortar and run the risk of builders trampling mud throughout your house when you could print out eight large blocks and assemble them to create an 8x5metre home?

 

That's right, mess-free housing in the time it takes to print and assemble. Shame somebody still needs to do the electrics and plumbing, though. If you don't fancy this rather outlandish-looking organic structure, not to worry – a Dutch architecture firm is preparing to 3D print a more conventional-looking canal house in Amsterdam.  

 

Moon base   What if you happen to live on the moon? Instead of the ProtoHouse 1.0, you could print yourself a moon dwelling like the European Space Agency is trying to do.

 

Using lunar soil, the hope is that the Monolite D-Shape printer will be able to build an entire moon base building in a week, keeping astronauts safe from radiation.  

 

EADS Airbike   Remember your first bicycle? Well, how about your first 3D printed bike?

 

That's right, you can print out your very own two-wheeled contraption and actually go somewhere on it. We'll be honest, it's not going to be easy to build – and a plastic frame will not absorb bumps particularly well – but you can't have it all.

  

Urbee car   If you're more of a petrolhead, the 3D-printed Urbee car has you covered, too. Kor Ecologic's three-wheeler is built using a 3D printed ABS plastic frame over a conventional metal chassis – meaning that complex parts like a dashboard with air ducts can simply be printed in one piece, rather than assembled from several different components. 3D printing also lets the designers fine-tune each part, so that components can be lighter and stronger than conventionally-manufactured parts.

 

All that results in a car that's just 545kg – but will, its designers say, meet the safety and tech requirements of Le Mans racing cars.  

 

Another 3D printer   It's not quite a self-replicating Von Neumann machine, but you can use a 3D printer to produce another 3D printer. Or you can just print any replacement parts or modifications as and when you like, which is handy.

 

Take your pick from the Cube or the Makerbot and set to work on building your very own robot army.

 

 

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In pictures: 3D-printed jewellery and artwork of Studio Mango

In pictures: 3D-printed jewellery and artwork of Studio Mango | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

One the studio's most recent projects is the Evolution Bracelet, designed for German label Purmundus, which approached Studio Mango with a request for a new range of 3D-printed jewellery.

 

 

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Lantos 3D Scanner for Imaging Ear Canal Approved by FDA

Lantos 3D Scanner for Imaging Ear Canal Approved by FDA | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

Lantos Technologies received FDA clearance for its 3D Ear Scanning System, a technology that makes it easy to make precise ear canal impressions.

 

Lantos entire system Lantos 3D Scanner for Imaging Ear Canal Approved by FDA (w/video)The device, which has a video otoscope on the tip, is inserted into the ear canal.

 

Once positioned, a liquid is pumped into the membrane surrounding the tip, which expands and fills the canal’s volume.

 

The camera is then slowly retracted and images its surroundings as it moves. 

 

Below is a video demonstrating the technology.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WeHTB4ZZ3OI

 

 

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