COOL 3DPRINTING
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COOL 3DPRINTING
All About 3d Printing!
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3D Printer Enclosure

3D Printer Enclosure | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

Not long after assembling my 3D Printer, my wife, Beehive, AKA She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed, banished my beloved, but slightly odorous machine to the garage.

 

See video:

the Schlabricator

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3D Printer Makes a 'Ship in a Bottle'

Published on Nov 21, 2012

 

This short video shows how an Objet Connex Multi-Material 3D Printer is used to create a classic 'ship in a bottle' model.

 

The Objet Connex system is able to jet two distinct materials (clear transparent and flexible black) within the same print session and then selectively place each material according to the 3D CAD design.

 

Objet Connex is the only 3D printing technology of its kind in the world able to combine different material properties within a single, consistent prototype or model.

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3D-Printed Skull Implant Ready for Operation

3D-Printed Skull Implant Ready for Operation | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

3D printing technology has helped replace 75 percent of a patient's skull with the approval of U.S. regulators.

 

The 3D-printed implant can replace the bone in people's skulls damaged by disease or trauma, according to Oxford Performance Materials.

 

The company announced it had received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its skull implant on Feb. 18 — a decision that led to the first U.S. surgical operation on March 4

 

"We see no part of the orthopedic industry being untouched by this," said Scott DeFelice, president of Oxford Performance Materials.



DeFelice's company had already begun selling 3D-printed implants overseas a year ago because it previously met an international standard.

 

But the FDA decision has opened the door for U.S. operations using the implants.

 

Video: A 3D Printer of Your Own

 

 

3D printing's advantage comes from taking the digitally scanned model of a patient's skull and "printing" out a matching 3D object layer by layer.

 

The precise manufacturing technique can even make tiny surface or edge details on the replacement part that encourage the growth of cells and allow skin to attach more easily.

 

About 300 to 500 U.S. patients could use skull bone replacements every month, according to DeFelice.

 

The possible patients include people with cancerous bone in their skulls, as well as car accident victims and U.S. military members suffering from head trauma.

DeFelice envisions going beyond the OsteoFab™ Patient Specific Cranial Device to make 3D-printed bone replacements for all parts of the human body. His company has already begun preparing to submit other 3D-printed bone parts for FDA approval — a huge market worth as much as $50 million to $100 million for each bone replacement type.

 

"If you can replace a bony void in someone's head next to the brain, you have a pretty good platform for filling bony voids elsewhere," DeFelice told TechNewsDaily.

 

Oxford Performance Materials adapted EOS P800 printing technology to use a special polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) material that has proved suitable for human implants.

 

The company runs a biomedical-compliant manufacturing facility in South Windsor, Conn., that can print bone replacements fitted for specific patients in two weeks or less.

 

Such possibilities represent just one small part of 3D printing's potential to revolutionize U.S. manufacturing and innovation. Oxford Performance Materials is one of many companies and universities that helped found the U.S. National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute — a $30 million pilot institute funded by the U.S. government to help transform 3D printing into a serious manufacturing tool.

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Dita Von Teese rocking the first ever 3D printed dress :12 Photos

Dita Von Teese rocking the first ever 3D printed dress :12 Photos | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This designer dress was an exclusive creation worn by Dita Von Tesse and was done using a 3D printer. I'd ask what you thought of the dress but I can't stop staring at Dita's perfectly supple breasts.

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Have yourself 3D-scanned and turned into a human gummi

Have yourself 3D-scanned and turned into a human gummi | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

a 3D printed confectioner in Shibuya, Tokyo, is offering nine lucky blokes the chance to have their bodies 3D scanned and rendered in gummi, the most wondrously magical of all the edible substances.

 

It's in honor of White Day, the Japanese give-your-male-lover-a-present holiday on March 14 (they also did custom chocolate-lollies of one's 3D scanned head for V-Day).

 

These are so amazingly amazing and they point the way to a future where cheap scanners will render entire rooms as voxels to be output in gummi, wherein you can pay to be encased while you slowly, deliciously eat your way out.

 

 

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Sunglass Partners With DIYROCKETS To Launch 3D-Printed Rocket Engine

Sunglass Partners With DIYROCKETS To Launch 3D-Printed Rocket Engine | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

Two startups responsible for helping push the envelope on collaborative design and the democratization of building hardware are launching a competition today that could take open source 3D printing to the next level – and perhaps even into orbit.

 

DIYROCKETS, the global space company co-founded by Darlene Damm and Diego Favarolo in 2012 to lower the cost of space exploration, and Sunglass, the TC Disrupt finalist and cloud-based 3D design platform founded by Nintin Rao and Kaustuv DeBiswas in 2011, today announced the launch of a competition to see who can build the best open source rocket engines via 3D printing.

 

The goal of the contest is to prove that not only can well-funded private company projects like SpaceX contribute to extraterrestrial exploration, but so can anyone, with the help of open source, collaborative design and tools that make building rigorously engineered 3D tech affordable and accessible, regardless of budget or available PC hardware.

 

“The goal of DIYROCKETS is to lower the cost of building space technology through crowdsourcing and opensourcing,” Damm said in an interview. “So this particular contest is tackling the challenge of transportation in the space industry, because it’s one of the most expensive things. It’s very costly to transfer things from earth up into space.”

 

To accomplish those goals, this contest is designed to get teams to think about the problem of designing rocket engines with three key components in mind. Damm explained that the idea is to rethink how the space industry thinks about sharing information and technological developments, as well as tackling cost and building a solid tech foundation.

 

“In the space industry everything’s been so fractured in the past few decades that you don’t have collaboration and the benefits of that,” she said.

 

“The second piece is that we’re trying to lower the cost through crowdsourcing and opensourcing the technology, so we’re asking that people submit a business case so that they’re not building some super expensive technology that’s not going to have any practical purpose.

 

Third, we’re evaluating the technical side of the design.”

 

Eventually, the aim is to build an entire marketplace of opensource rocket parts from which engineers can choose from to build their own projects, and ultimately send those projects into space.

 

The competition will include three prizes, including a grand prize for best overall submission worth $5,000 for best design based on technical criteria, collaboration and business case.

 

The second prize follows the same criteria but is specifically for student teams and is worth $2,500, and the third-place prize is also worth $2,500 and focuses solely on collaboration.

 

In addition to those prizes, provided by Sunglass, there’s also a bonus offer from Shapeways, which is supplying free printing credits to all winners.

 

All three winners will also receive free consulting from the Silicon Valley Space Center.

 

Even though there’s a prize specifically for students, Sunglass founder Nitin Rao explained that both parties expect to see participants from a wide variety of fields enter the race.

 

 The whole point of the project is to source good design and worthwhile input from wherever it may reside, regardless of any class/professional/monetary barriers that may have prevented some from participating in the past.

 

Once a winner is crowned, we’ll be well on the way to seeing a 3D printed rocket actually take flight, since everyone knows the rocket engine is the hardest part. Okay that may not be exactly true (I’m no expert), but it could still be the beginning of an exciting era for space exploration

 

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Researchers developing 3D printer, 'bio-ink' to create human organs

 

Researchers in the UI Center for Computer aided Design's Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMTecH) group are refining equipment and techniques that may result in the 3D printing of human organs and tissue some five or 10 years from now.

 

Experts agree that rising Chinese labor costs and improving U.S. technology will gradually cause significant manufacturing activity to return to the United States.

 

When it does, a new interdisciplinary manufacturing venture called the Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMTecH) group at the University of Iowa College of Engineering’s Center for Computer Aided Design (CCAD) will likely help lead the charge.AMTecH was formed to design, create, and test—both virtually and physically—a wide variety of electromechanical and biomedical components, systems and processes.

 

Currently, the group is working on projects ranging from printed circuit boards for automobiles and aircraft to replacement parts for damaged and failing human organs and tissue, says Tim Marler, AMTecH co-director

 

See Video :

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=JRBa9YifVTY

Read more:

 

http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/biotech/newsid=29445.php#ixzz2N42DWc7A

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MakerBot’s Desktop 3D Scanner Is a Real-Life Star Trek Replicator

MakerBot’s Desktop 3D Scanner Is a Real-Life Star Trek Replicator | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it
Once a tool designed exclusively for trained technicians, 3D printers are now almost as easy to use as your desktop inkjet—except when it comes to designing and prepping the requisite 3D models.
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VIDEO: Prehistoric Art Of Panther Cave Reproduced In 3D

VIDEO: Prehistoric Art Of Panther Cave Reproduced In 3D | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it
Panther Cave in Seminole Canyon, Texas, has some of the country's best-preserved prehistoric cave paintings.
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Rethinking objects key to 3D printing revolution

Rethinking objects key to 3D printing revolution | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

3D printing has already changed the game for manufacturing specialised products such as medical devices but the real revolution will come when designers start to rethink the shapes of objects.
 

 

 

3D printing removes the limitations of the manufacturing process from the equation, which means whatever can be designed on a computer can be turned into an object, 3D printing specialists say.
 
To really start using the technology to its full potential, designers and engineers need to imagine new products.
 
"You are almost unlimited as to the type of geometric complexity," said Terry Wohlers, an independent analyst who advises companies on the 3D printing sector.
 
Belgium-based company Materialise, a pioneer in the process, has a display of a foldable chair printed from one continuous piece of plastic - and made with the hinges already joined together, for example.
 
"You can do shapes and forms that otherwise would be very expensive to do with traditional manufacturing, or would require many parts that then are later assembled," Wohlers said.
 
The 3D process has been used to build prototypes for 25 years, but only now is making its way into regular production. Companies such as General Electric plan to use 3D printing to build lightweight aircraft parts, while dentists use it to create crowns in the space of an hour rather than two weeks.
 
3D printers have made working guns and are being tested to see if they can make houses on the moon using lunar soil. Scientists hope they may one day print human organs after researchers successfully printed tissue using human stem cells.
 
US President Barack Obama even highlighted the technology in this year's State of the Union address as an example of innovation that can create jobs.
 
But Materialise CEO Wilfried Vancraen, recently voted the most influential person in the 3D printing sector by readers of TCT Magazine, a publication devoted to the industry, says the process is too slow and too expensive to replace most mass market manufacturing - at least as we now know it.
 
"3D Printing is not suited to making most of the products that we use today. You cannot print a Stradivarius just as you can't print an iPad," he said.
 
"What we have seen is that just replacing a product by a 3D printed product, for instance in the spare part application, is in many cases even not feasible, and in no cases really economical."
 
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What you can do is involve the computer in the design process, so it can work out how to improve designs, for example to handle stress better.
 
"Any part that requires some structural integrity, you can let mathematics decide where to put the material," said Wohlers.
 
"The design can look very organic and very different than what you would normally see."
 
It's in fields such as medicine and furniture and clothing design that the technology has already had a huge impact.
 
Already, well over 90 percent of in-the-ear hearing aids are made using 3D printing, and that lets clever software which can work out exactly how to optimise the acoustic properties of the hearing aid into the manufacturing process.
 
Switzerland-based Sonova, a leading maker of hearing aids, is now using graphics software to modify the shape of the device once it has been scanned, improving its physical fit to the individual ear canal, and its acoustic qualities.
 
That's all thanks to 3D printing, as this couldn't be done cost-efficiently before.
 
"Take your fingers, block you ear canals both and speak, and your own voice sounds horrible," said Stefan Launer, Sonova's Vice President Science & Technology.
 
"By intelligently placing acoustic vents into these housings you can reduce this effect, and that's what we call an acoustic optimised vent, and that's something we can do with this software."
 
The biggest 3D printers, known as mammoth stereolithograhy machines, have a printing area over 2 meters long and can take up to a week to complete the biggest print jobs.
 
Inside, an intricate pattern of lasers play over the surface of liquid plastic resin.
 
Layer by layer, they solidify the resin to form the 3D printed object under the liquid. At the end of the print, the object rises out of the liquid as it is pushed up out of the reservoir.
 
In the case of printing houses on the moon, researchers are experimenting with mixing lunar soil mixed with magnesium oxide and a binding salt, building the structure up layer by layer at about 2 metres (6.6 feet) per hour.
 
To create human tissue, scientists from Scotland's Heriot-Watt University loaded human stem cells into two separate reservoirs and deposited them onto a plate in a pre-programmed pattern.
 
The first commercial 3D printer was put on show by South Carolina-based 3D Systems in 1988. Inspired, Vancraen set up Materialise two years later.
 
"Some printers allow now to mix different materials with different material properties: hard, soft, different densities crossing through one piece," said Vancraen.
 
"That is the most unexplored (characteristic), but also the most difficult to really use well."
 
He believes that as the new uses emerge, the manufacturing applications of 3D printing will continue to grow, eventually being worth 10, 20 or 30 percent of the manufacturing industry.
 

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Visualized: 3D Systems' 3D-printed guitar, the Americana

Visualized: 3D Systems' 3D-printed guitar, the Americana | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

The crazy looking guitar you see above from 3D Systems (being manhandled by our own Andy Bowen) was printed.

 

Not created by machines or people, but pieced together by a 3D printer -- at least the body, that is.

 

The neck, strings, and various jacks / knobs are all fabricated via other methods, but the body is all printed.

 

That includes the many America-centric icons seen throughout the body, from the Statute of Liberty to the Brooklyn Bridge -- okay, okay, it's rather New York-centric, but 3D Systems head Avi Reichental tells us that 3D Systems used iconic New York locations as a representation for the "Americana" the guitar is supposed to embody.

 

He says -- and we can't help but agree, many of us being New Yorkers -- that New York is an "emotional" symbol for the USA. Join us for a visual tour of the Americana, set to the backdrop of the San Francisco Bay, won't you?

 

 

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3D printing 'bigger than internet

3D printing 'bigger than internet | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

Proponents of 3D printing say it has the potential to alter radically a number of industries.

 

http://video.ft.com/v/1700835179001/3D-printing-bigger-than-internet-

 

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3D printing opens opportunities for solar power

3D printing opens opportunities for solar power | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

While the technology has not yet made its way into widespread practical application, 3D printing has been proposed as an engineering solution for everything from medicine to moon bases. 

 

John Licata, chief energy strategist at consulting firm Blue Phoenix, suggests in a piece in The Guardian another area where the technique could mean a dramatic change - solar power.

 

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This DIY, 3D-Printed Violin Is Nearly Ready To Play Beautiful Music

This DIY, 3D-Printed Violin Is Nearly Ready To Play Beautiful Music | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

Like many complex 3D-printed projects, this violin isn’t entirely made on a 3D printer but it’s interesting nonetheless. 

 

It is a violin that costs about $12 to build and uses paper, 3D printed parts, and some cheap wire to make an instrument that, while not pretty to look at, is definitely capable of making some sort of music

.

The project, run by Alex Davies, is definitely in the extreme DIY vein. To make the violin, they 3D printed a mold for the body, laid material over it (in this case, paper) and prepared a neck out of cardboard.

 

Here’s the bill of materials, such as it is:

Some newspaper, pilfered from the bus stop.


- Flour and water for the wheat paste.

 

- A 3D printer, and maybe 4 dollars worth of plastic.

 

- Some picture hanging wire, pilfered from my room mate.

 

- A drill, with a few drill bits.

 

- A bottle of chai tea liquor.

 

The team even went so far as to make their own strings using a bit of wire and a drill. They used 3D-printed ABS plastic for some of the parts and used papier-mâché for the body, which seems to work fine.

 

It’s obviously no Stradivarius but the fact that it’s even slightly playable is a great bit of luck and, with a bit of refinement I could see this as a real, usable product. In fact, the paper “exceeded expectations” in the sound department.

 

The trick with 3D printing is that it can be used to make many things but not everything. Ideally most 3D printing projects should require as little hands-on crafting as possible but this is obviously not always the case.

 

However, the DIY movement has to start somewhere, even if it’s with a poor, beleaguered violinist causing a handmade instrument to yowl in pain.

 

You can see the video  about the project here.

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3D Printing Could Grow to Over $3.7 Billion by 2015

3D Printing Could Grow to Over $3.7 Billion by 2015 | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

In the world of manufacturing, 3D printing has already changed the game for making specialized products such as medical devices, but the real revolution will come when designers start to rethink the shapes of objects.

 

3D printing removes the limitations of the manufacturing process from the equation, which means whatever can be designed on a computer can be turned into an object, 3D printing specialists say.

 

To start using the technology to its full potential, designers and engineers need to imagine new products

 

RELATED: 3D Printing Business Gets Boost from Obama

 

"You are almost unlimited as to the type of geometric complexity," said Terry Wohlers, an independent analyst who advises companies on the 3D printing sector.

 

Belgium-based company Materialise, a pioneer in the process, has a display of a foldable chair printed from one continuous piece of plastic - and made with the hinges already joined together, for example.

 

"You can do shapes and forms that otherwise would be very expensive to do with traditional manufacturing, or would require many parts that then are later assembled," Wohlers said.

 

The 3D process has been used to build prototypes for 25 years, but only now is making its way into regular production. Companies such as General Electric Co plan to use 3D printing to build lightweight aircraft parts, while dentists use it to create crowns in the space of an hour rather than two weeks.

The Fiscal Times FREE Newsletter
 

3D printers have made working guns and are being tested to see if they can make houses on the moon using lunar soil.

 

Scientists hope they may one day print human organs after researchers successfully printed tissue using human stem cells. U.S. President Barack Obama even highlighted the technology in this year's State of the Union address as an example of innovation that can create jobs

.

But Materialise CEO Wilfried Vancraen, recently voted the most influential person in the 3D printing sector by readers of TCT Magazine, a publication devoted to the industry, says the process is too slow and too expensive to replace most mass market manufacturing - at least as we now know it.

 

"3D Printing is not suited to making most of the products that we use today. You cannot print a Stradivarius just as you can't print an iPad," he said. "What we have seen is that just replacing a product by a 3D printed product, for instance in the spare part application, is in many cases even not feasible, and in no cases really economical."

 

ROBOT DESIGNERS
What you can do is involve the computer in the design process, so it can work out how to improve designs, for example to handle stress better.

 

"Any part that requires some structural integrity, you can let mathematics decide where to put the material," said Wohlers. "The design can look very organic and very different than what you would normally see."

 

It's in fields such as medicine, furniture and clothing design that the technology has already had a huge impact. Already, well over 90 percent of in-the-ear hearing aids are made using 3D printing, and that lets clever software which can work out exactly how to optimize the acoustic properties of the hearing aid into the manufacturing process.

 

Switzerland-based Sonova, a leading maker of hearing aids, is now using graphics software to modify the shape of the device once it has been scanned, improving its physical fit to the individual ear canal, and its acoustic qualities.

 

That's all thanks to 3D printing, as this couldn't be done cost efficiently before. "Take your fingers, block your ear canals both and speak, and your own voice sounds horrible," said Stefan Launer, Sonova's vice president for science and technology. "By intelligently placing acoustic vents into these housings, you can reduce this effect, and that's what we call an acoustic optimized vent, and that's something we can do with this software."

 

The biggest 3D printers, known as mammoth stereolithograhy machines, have a printing area over 2 meters long and can take up to a week to complete the biggest print jobs. Inside, an intricate pattern of lasers play over the surface of liquid plastic resin. Layer by layer, they solidify the resin to form the 3D printed object under the liquid.

At the end of the print, the object rises out of the liquid as it is pushed up out of the reservoir.

 

In the case of printing houses on the moon, researchers are experimenting with mixing lunar soil mixed with magnesium oxide and a binding salt, building the structure up layer by layer at about 2 meters (6.6 feet) per hour.

 

To create human tissue, scientists from Scotland's Heriot-Watt University loaded human stem cells into two separate reservoirs and deposited them onto a plate in a pre-programmed pattern.

 

The first commercial 3D printer was put on show by South Carolina-based 3D Systems in 1988.

 

Inspired, Vancraen set up Materialise two years later. "Some printers allow now to mix different materials with different material properties: hard, soft, different densities crossing through one piece," said Vancraen.

 

"That is the most unexplored (characteristic), but also the most difficult to really use well."

 

He believes that as the new uses emerge, the manufacturing applications of 3D printing will continue to grow, eventually being worth 10, 20 or 30 percent of the manufacturing industry.

 

Wohlers estimates the 3D printing industry was worth $1.7 billion worldwide in 2011, and will grow to more than $3.7 billion by 2015. "The growth has been nothing short of phenomenal," he said.


Read more at http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2013/03/06/3D-Printing-Could-Grow-to-Over-3-7-Billion-by-2015.aspx#IlwuDxQYtfeXc0R3.99
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3D-Printed Skull Implant Ready for Operation

3D-Printed Skull Implant Ready for Operation | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

3D printing technology has helped replace 75 percent of a patient's skull with the approval of U.S. regulators.

 

The 3D-printed implant can replace the bone in people's skulls damaged by disease or trauma, according to Oxford Performance Materials.

 

The company announced it had received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its skull implant on Feb. 18 — a decision that led to the first U.S. surgical operation on March 4

 

"We see no part of the orthopedic industry being untouched by this," said Scott DeFelice, president of Oxford Performance Materials.



DeFelice's company had already begun selling 3D-printed implants overseas a year ago because it previously met an international standard.

 

But the FDA decision has opened the door for U.S. operations using the implants.

 

Video: A 3D Printer of Your Own

 

 

3D printing's advantage comes from taking the digitally scanned model of a patient's skull and "printing" out a matching 3D object layer by layer.

 

The precise manufacturing technique can even make tiny surface or edge details on the replacement part that encourage the growth of cells and allow skin to attach more easily.

 

About 300 to 500 U.S. patients could use skull bone replacements every month, according to DeFelice.

 

The possible patients include people with cancerous bone in their skulls, as well as car accident victims and U.S. military members suffering from head trauma.

DeFelice envisions going beyond the OsteoFab™ Patient Specific Cranial Device to make 3D-printed bone replacements for all parts of the human body. His company has already begun preparing to submit other 3D-printed bone parts for FDA approval — a huge market worth as much as $50 million to $100 million for each bone replacement type.

 

"If you can replace a bony void in someone's head next to the brain, you have a pretty good platform for filling bony voids elsewhere," DeFelice told TechNewsDaily.

 

Oxford Performance Materials adapted EOS P800 printing technology to use a special polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) material that has proved suitable for human implants.

 

The company runs a biomedical-compliant manufacturing facility in South Windsor, Conn., that can print bone replacements fitted for specific patients in two weeks or less.

 

Such possibilities represent just one small part of 3D printing's potential to revolutionize U.S. manufacturing and innovation. Oxford Performance Materials is one of many companies and universities that helped found the U.S. National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute — a $30 million pilot institute funded by the U.S. government to help transform 3D printing into a serious manufacturing tool.

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Can 3D Printers And Strict Gun Regulation Coexist?

Can 3D Printers And Strict Gun Regulation Coexist? | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

3D printed guns are creating quite a bit of controversy in the U.S. Proponents say having access to 3D printed gun parts preserves freedom in the face of regulation, while opponents say it will only make it easier for people to sneak guns into gun-free zones.

 

What about other countries though? What’s their take on 3D printed firearms?

A recent report from Al Jazeera UK looked into the matter of 3D printed firearms, and how the easy availability of parts over the Internet may undermine current gun regulation.


This report, much like a previous BBC piece on 3D printing, misses a key fact that was omitted either out of ignorance or in the name of creating a sensational story. Defense Distributed has not made a 3D printed gun.

 

They have made a 3D printed AR lower.

 

Those wanting to build a gun would still need the other heavily regulated parts.

That being said, the central question of the report is still worth asking. How do 3D printers fit into the overall discussion on gun control and regulation? It’s especially important in countries where guns are far more regulated.

 

It would be unfortunate if any of these countries passed knee-jerk reaction legislation banning certain 3D printers over a fear that the technology may one day produce a fully 3D printed gun. It’s incredibly short-sighted, and ignores the wide array of benefits that 3D printing brings to the fields of medicine and manufacturing.

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=FS55nYfs_l8

 

 

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What 3D printing can do for your bored toddler - Salon

What 3D printing can do for your bored toddler - Salon | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

 

Bre Pettis, the founder and CEO of MakerBot, a Brooklyn-based manufacturer of inexpensive 3D printers, gave the opening remarks at SXSW Interactive.

 

He was a natural choice to kick off the festival. Social media is old news — 3D printing is every geek’s favorite technology-of-the-moment.

 

Pettis said all the usual things you might expect of someone preaching his own start-up’s gospel. Thanks to cheap 3D printers, “creativity is more accessible in the thing world.”

 

“3D printing is ushering in a new industrial revolution.”

“3D printing is awesome.” He said that more than once.

 

But then he showed a slide, in which a custom-printed plastic part connected a set of Brio wooden train track pieces to a Duplo brick. And every parent in the audience who had once entertained his or toddlers with a big pile of Duplo and Brio tracks simultaneously went: “oh, wow, I wish I’d had that, back in the day.”

 

Geeks talk a lot about connectivity. But connecting two things that were previously incompatible takes the talk and makes it real.

 

The notion that cheap 3D printing will give us the power to scoff at incompatibility is a wonderful thing. It takes SXSW buzzwords like the “power of geek innovation” and puts some muscle behind the jargon.

 

Our world is full of pieces that don’t match. So what? Time to make your own pieces that fit everything together.

 

After the keynote, I discovered that the Brio-to-Duplo connector turned out to not to be particularly new. But judging by the murmurs in the crowd of thousands at SXSW, the sight of the slide clicked a switch. We’d heard 3D technology was whiz-bang neat. Now we understood why.

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MakerBot Digitizer 3D scanner: real world cut-and-paste

MakerBot Digitizer 3D scanner: real world cut-and-paste | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis says his 3D printing company is working on a desktop 3D scanner called the Digitizer, to help ease the process of translating real-world objects into a 3D-printable software file

 

Pettis made the announcement during his South By Southwest keynote address this afternoon in Austin, Texas.

 

Scanning is one of three ways to obtain a printable design file for a 3D object, along with downloading a file created by someone else, and using software to design a model from scratch.

 

Commercial scanners already exist, but cost thousands of dollars. You can also find plans for DIY scanners that use 3D imaging devices like the camera in

 

MakerBot has not yet announced the price of the Digitizer, said to still be in prototype form, but the press release quotes Pettis saying, "Now everyone will be able to scan a physical object," suggesting that it might at least be consumer-approachable, similiar to its original $1,800 Replicator 3D printer.

 

The release also indicated that the Digitizer will use the traditional combination of "lasers and cameras to replicate physical objects

 

 

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Canadore's studios leading way in 3D

Canadore's studios leading way in 3D | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it



Recently, Canadore announced another industry partnership, this time with Jake Seal, president of a 3D hologram company called JSA Holdings.

 

 

 

 

 

Seal has an extensive background with the entertainment industry particularly in 3D holographic projections, 3D holograms, 3D printing and 2D to 3D conversions.

 

Seals also has a background in the financing, development and production of movies and television shows.

 

He is currently producing Limousine 3D, a movie being shot in Canada and the Untied States and directed by Toronto-born director, Ted Kotcheff.

 

JSA’s partnership with Canadore will give their media students a chance to learn how to produce 3D VFX (Visual Special Effects) and 3D holograms.

 

Under Seal’s supervision, students will also learn to produce webisodes (short visual clips primarily designed for website content).

 

The regular term will be followed up by a two week “3D Boot Camp” led by Seal. The camp will only be open to Canadore students already in the Digital Cinematography and Broadcast TV programs. Students will learn about the history of 3D technology, the creative use of 3D storytelling, how to write for 3D and how to use 3D characters, converting from 2D to 3D and finally how to edit, finish and deliver the final 3D production.

 

Seal says he partnered with Canadore because when they were looking for an educational partner, his company wanted to find a college where “we could integrate cross-curriculum in order to maximise both the film’s impact visually, as well as the regional economic benefit of bringing 80 per cent of a film’s activity to a relatively small northern city. Canadore was perfect for us.”

 

Seal calls Canadore “A truly unique college – they have a proactive, can do, positivity that seems to be hardwired into their collective DNA. This makes them an exciting partner with a wide-ranging ambition.”

 

That’s what many industry professionals say as they visit Canadore College’s newly opened Innovation Centre for Advanced Manufacturing (ICAMP) at its Commerce Court Campus.

 

The $2.4 million, 3,200 square foot facility boasts one of the most advanced film production facilities found anywhere in Canada.

 

One of the stars of the ICAMP facility is the Red Epic camera system capable of capturing visual images at a rate ranging from one to 120 frames per second at full resolution. In addition to the Red Epic system, ICAMP boasts two television studios, a giant green screen that allows users to insert a digital background behind an actor or object plus a motion capture camera system that can convert an actor’s live action motion into digitally animated images.

 

In addition to state-of-the-art equipment and software, Canadore relies on its team of instructors who still work in the industry.

 

Yura Monestime, Canadore College coordinator of Broadcast Television Program and professor of Digital Cinematography, has twenty years’ experience working at Global and CTV and he still directs the annual Lions/CTV Children telethon.

 

“We intend our graduates to be 100 per cent industry-ready when they leave our programs,” says David Himmelman, Dean of the School of Media, Design and Dramatic arts at Canadore. “Many of the students who have transferred over from other programs can’t believe that they get to be hands-on with the equipment from day one,” Himmelman laughs.

 

Last year Lon Molnar, CEO of 3D special effects studio Intelligent Creatures, formed a partnership with ICAMP to study the possibility of using Canadore’s facilities and students to convert feature-length movies that were originally shot in 2D format into 3D. Although the partnership has not yet produced a converted movie, Himmelman says the research is continuing.

 

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14 Incredible 3D Printing Creations

14 Incredible 3D Printing Creations | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

 

3D printing has been boggling minds the world over for years now, but recently the technology has become even more accessible.

 

An object is printed in three dimensions from a digital file by layering solid materials in specific patterns.

 

Companies like Shapeways are helping to make 3D printing consumer-friendly, putting not only the printers but the printed items themselves into the hands of everyday people.

 

Shapeways CEO Peter Weijmarshausen invited Mashable to curate some of our favorite 3D-printed items from its online shop

 

So, take a look through the above gallery for some of our favorite gadgets, accessories and art.



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3D printing's rise comes with unanswered questions

3D printing's rise comes with unanswered questions | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

Click on picture for Video

 

A proponent of 3D printing in New Zealand says the emergence of weapons made using the technology poses an ethical dilemma for the burgeoning industry.

 

The Wikiweapons project, spearheaded by Texas law student Cody Wilson, aims to make it possible for anyone to access plans to 3D print guns.

 

In a recent appearance on Glenn Beck’s Fox News show Mr Wilson said Wikiweapons was a way to ensure guns will never be erased.

 

Massey University lecturer Olaf Diegel, who is the world’s only commercial retailer of 3D printed guitars, says he is suspicious of Wikiweapons’ motives but thinks Mr Wilson’s rhetoric does have merit.

 

“He might be a bit of a gun nut who wants to promote guns for everyone, but some of the issues he raises through doing that are still completely valid in terms of what is the value of a gun, the power of a gun,” says Mr Diegel.

 

With 3D printing at a similar stage in its lifetime to the internet around the time Napster took off, Mr Diegel says the industry is at a crucial stage in its development.

 

With cheap printers becoming more accessible, people are beginning to upload designs of just about anything that anybody with a 3D printer can create.

“My guess is we'll get to an in-between stage where we'll have the ‘7-11 concept’ where you'll go with your files to the local 7-11 and they'll print the files for you,” he says.

 

American stationery supply company Staples is already offering customers a service similar to this, though it makes its 3D products out of paper.

 

An infamous anti-piracy ad blazed the moniker "you wouldn't steal a car” ac

ross TV and movie screens throughout the 2000s in a too-little-too-late effort to stop the rise of copyright theft, but with 3D technology it is possible to entirely copy one, presenting all kinds of intellectual property issues.

 

“It's gonna increase over the next five to 10 years in terms of those ethical issues around things like that, things like liability - who's responsible if I download a file for a chair or a gun and the chair breaks or the gun kills somebody or blows up and kills me?” Mr Diegel questions.

 

For now though, 3D gun technology is only at the point where certain parts can be made – an entire gun is still a while away.

 

The 3D guitar though is a reality and Mr Diegel’s business is booming.

After first experimenting with a printed guitar design while holidaying in South Africa last year, he’s now taking orders from overseas – including The Steve Miller Band, who will pick up their guitar when they tour New Zealand this week.

Mr Diegel says contrary to the opinion of some traditionalists, they sound just as good as their more traditional counterparts.



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Gigabot is a huge consumer 3D printer awaiting your Kickstarter dollars (video)

Gigabot is a huge consumer 3D printer awaiting your Kickstarter dollars (video) | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

The standard crop of 3D printers are all well and good, but what about those times when you need to print something really, really big?

 

Gigabot's hoping to fill in that gaping void with a build envelope of 24 x 24 x 24 inches -- 30 times the volume of a standard consumer device, by its calculations. The device is a beast, naturally -- and metal one, at that.

 

 It's so big, in fact, that it can support a full-sized laptop sitting atop an attached arm.

 

The project is the brainchild of re:3D, an Austin-based startup, which has turned to Kickstarter to help bring the Gigabot into the world -- and from the looks of it, the company should hit its $40,000 goal, no problem.

 

You can pick one of these up for a $2,500 pledge, which gets you everything thing you need to build one at home. Video of the printer in action after the break

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Watch now: Will 3D Printing Change the World?

 

The rise of 3D Printing has raised eyebrows and a number of questions about its future.

 

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