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COOL 3DPRINTING
All About 3d Printing!
Curated by Andre Bontems
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Is 3D printing right for you?

Is 3D printing right for you? | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


Medical device and development experts with news, contractors resources on medical equipment manufacturers and products, materials, medical components for medical device engineers, contractors, designers.


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3D Printing Cancerous Cells Can be Used to Further Cancer Research

3D Printing Cancerous Cells Can be Used to Further Cancer Research | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


3D printing technology is now being used to further cancer research.
Using 3D printers, researchers have made a tumor-like lump of cancerous cells.


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3D printing gets closer to printing living human tissue - DigitalJournal.com

3D printing gets closer to printing living human tissue - DigitalJournal.com | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


A new bioprinting method has created intricately patterned 3-D tissue constructs with multiple types of cells and tiny blood vessels. Researchers are hopeful that printing living tissue will soon be possible.
3D printing is a process of making a three-dimensional solid object of virtually any shape from a digital model. 3D printing is achieved using an additive process, where successive layers of material are laid down in different shapes. With the new technology for creating cells and blood vessels, the scientists behind the project regard this as the foundational step toward creating 3D living tissue. Currently when scientists have tried to print layers of tissue, cells on the interior starve for oxygen and nutrients, and have no good way of removing carbon dioxide and other waste. So they suffocate and die.
This new research has focused on tiny, thin-walled blood vessels that nourish the tissue and remove waste.
Getting this right is key to creating living cells. In theory, the ability to form functional vascular networks in 3D tissues before they are implanted not only enables thicker tissues to be formed



Read more: http://digitaljournal.com/science/3d-printing-gets-closer-to-printing-living-human-tissue/article/375539#ixzz2vdcz4jWE

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3D Printer Produces Custom-Made Pacemaker - ABC News (blog)

3D Printer Produces Custom-Made Pacemaker - ABC News (blog) | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


Scientists have designed an artificial heart membrane that may one day revolutionize pacemakers.


Using a 3D printer, high-resolution images and computer modeling, researchers at the University of Illinois and Washington University created a 3D replica of a rabbit’s heart then used it as a template to produce a thin, flexible sheath of silicon that fit snugly around the heart. Next they fitted the custom-made pouch with a web of sensors and electrodes that monitored the heart and kept it beating in a steady rhythm.


Lead researcher John Rogers, a materials scientist at the University of Illinois, said the device acts like an artificial pericardium, the thin, outer sac that wraps around the heart like a tailored garment.


“The goal was to create a membrane that fit tightly but not so tightly that it interfered with the normal beating of the heart,” he said.


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Terminator-Like Prosthetic Arm on Display in 3-D Printing Exhibit

Terminator-Like Prosthetic Arm on Display in 3-D Printing Exhibit | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


In the future, will we be able to 3-D print replacement body parts? Researchers at the University of Nottingham are working hard to make such a future possible.


To give the public a taste of what's to come, Professor Richard Hague, director of the University's Additive Manufacturing and 3-D Printing Research Group, and his students developed a mockup of a functional 3-D printed prosthetic arm for the 3d: Printing the Future exhibit at the Science Museum London.


The arm, which is very Terminator-esque, will be on display among 600 3-D printed objects until July 1 of next year.

3-D Printing Both the Structure and the Moving Parts

Currently, 3-D printers are not sophisticated enough to build both the structure of an object and its electrical parts. "At the moment 3D printing uses single materials, a polymer or a metal, which are fused together with a laser," said Hague. "You can create interwoven geometries but they're still passive." By combining structure, mobile joints and delicate sensors all in one process, however, the Terminator arm demonstrates how 3-D printers can create both structural and electrical parts for the same object, at the same time.


By including circuits that sense temperature, feel objects and control the arm's movement, Hague's arm is an example of the breakthroughs to come in the near future of 3-D printing, some say even within the next 10 to 15 years. "3-D printing gives us the freedom to make complex, optimized shapes, and our research aim is focused on printing-in electrical, optical or even biological functions," Hague said.


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3D-printed pump keeps damaged hearts beating in time

3D-printed pump keeps damaged hearts beating in time | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

Your options are pretty limited if you have serious heart failure. Either you get a heart transplant, which are ex-tremely hard to come by, or you have to be hooked up to a bedside system to keep your heart pumping.

Now, a new 3D-printed, battery-operated implant will let people go about their day-to-day lives while they wait for a transplant.

Developed by Philip Breedon and his colleagues at Nottingham Trent University in the UK, the "smart aortic graft" is designed for people whose hearts have problems pumping enough blood around their body.

Heart transplants aren't a viable option for everyone because there is higher demand than supply – around 160,000 people in Europe require one each year but only 600 are available.

The other option is being fitted with a "ventricular assist" pump that is implanted into the body.

These pumps are often connected through the skin to an external power source, which creates a potential source of infection and means the patient is bed-bound in hospital.



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3D Printing Is a Matter of Life and Death

3D Printing Is a Matter of Life and Death | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

When Kaiba Gionfriddo was born prematurely on Oct. 28, 2011, everything seemed relatively normal.


At 35 weeks, his doctors' main concern was lung development, but Kaiba was breathing just fine. Doctors deemed him healthy enough to send him home within a few days.


Six weeks later, while the Gionfriddo family — parents April and Bryan, and two older siblings — were eating dinner at a restaurant, Kaiba stopped breathing and turned blue. After 10 days in the hospital and another incident, physicians diagnosed the infant with severe tracheobronchomalacia; his windpipe was so weak that his trachea and left bronchus collapsed, preventing crucial airflow from reaching his lungs.


So Kaiba underwent a tracheostomy and was put on a ventilator, the typical treatment for his condition.


It didn't work. Almost daily, Kaiba would stop breathing and his heart would stop. The prognosis wasn't good. So his doctors tried something revolutionary: a 3D-printed lung splint that could save his life.


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3D Printing in the Medicine: Saving Time and Saving Lives - ABAAD

3D Printing in the Medicine: Saving Time and Saving Lives - ABAAD | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

The technology of 3D printing is beneficial for a long list of industries that will change the world and how we do business.

Since it was introduced commercially to the world, many have embraced the advantages of rapid prototyping especially in the field of medicine.

Specialists in the area have come to discover that 3D printing in medicine can be used in order to create exact replicas of certain organs so that they can study it without risking the patient’s life replacing the practice of exposing the organ. Instead, doctors can now create a replica of an organ based on a scan of the real one and this dramatically and significantly saves time. In a recent news featured on Mashable, 3D casts are now possible.

Repairing broken bones no longer have to involve uncomfortable “old fashioned” casts that are bulky, itchy and sometimes even prone to other complications such as infections. Jake Evill broke his hand and felt that plaster casts were not only uncomfortable but “archaic”.

With this experience and his expertise, he hacked an Xbox to scan a cast and 3D printed his design. He names his 3D printed cast the “Cortex Cast”, which brings to the world a new and cooler design to repair broken bones. You can view the cortex cast here.

Another benefit of 3D printing in the medical field is the ability to print organ replicas for surgeons to study a human organ prior to opening up a patient.

This is most helpful in complicated cases such as studying tumors that must be extracted.

From a CT scan of an organ, surgeons can now 3D print exact models without compromising a surgery or more importantly, a patient’s life. On an operating table, every second counts and this technology has made a giant leap in the medical field possible.

Surgeons can now plan their surgeries by holding an actual replica of a patient’s heart in their hands and plan their surgeries carefully by bridging the gap of the possibilities of error and eradicating these possibilities completely.

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Can 3D printers save lives? - Lifestyle - dna

Can 3D printers  save  lives? - Lifestyle -  dna | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


This April, a cancer survivor in the United Kingdom became the first ever patient to have his face reconstructed using a 3D printed prosthetic.


The cancer had left him with a gaping hole on the left of his face, requiring him to be fed through a tube fitted into his stomach. Surgeons restructured his face using old photographs and a mirror image of the existing portion, then printed the silicon prosthetic.



From fashion to aerospace engineering, 3D printing, also known as Additive Manufacturing, is increasingly used in multiple industries with researchers also


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Chinese Scientists Are 3D Printing Ears and Livers

Chinese Scientists Are 3D Printing Ears and Livers | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


Researchers in China have been able to successfully print human organs using specialized 3D printers that use living cells instead of plastic.



Researchers in China have been able to successfully print human organs using specialized 3D printers that use living cells instead of plastic.


Researchers at Hangzhou Dianzi University actually went as far as inventing their own 3D printer for the complex task, dubbed the “Regenovo.”


“Xu Mingen, Regenovo's developer, said that it takes the printer under an hour to produce either a mini liver sample or a four to five inch ear cartilage sample. Xu also predicted that fully functional printed organs may be possible within the next ten to twenty years,” stated 3D Printer World.



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Living kidneys printed out in E China


Researchers at a university in eastern Zhejiang Province have used a 3D printer to create living kidneys, which is expected to be used for transplants in the future


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15 Ways 3D Printing Is Saving The World

15 Ways 3D Printing Is Saving The World | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


From feeding hungry astronauts to mending broken bones, 3D printing is changing the world in a big way. Get your mind blown below, then get a 3D-printed version of yourself with the Datalandify


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3D printed surgical guides save Malaysian man’s arm

3D printed surgical guides save Malaysian man’s arm | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


Surgery is expensive and potentially risky, and 3D printed surgical guides reduce costs and the chance of something going wrong.


Bioprinting is one of the more complex forms of 3D printing, and it will improve the lives of millions in the coming years.


But it’s not the only form of 3D printing that will help us live fuller lives.


As I mentioned in 3D Systems Investor and Analyst Day Highlights, surgical guides are already being printed to help surgeons execute precision tasks. Here’s a specific example of the method: Materialise, the company that distributes the Mimics Innovation Suite that was used in the designing of the 3D printed splint that saved baby Kaiba, worked with surgeons in Malaysia to create a guide that allowed a man’s armed to be saved.


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3D printed Osteoid cast with built-in ultrasound helps bones heal faster

3D printed Osteoid cast with built-in ultrasound helps bones heal faster | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


Osteoid cast Old-fashioned casts for broken bones can smell and cause itching.


But 3D printed casts can take care of those issues. Deniz Karasahin has designed the next step: a custom cast with an ultrasound device to speed up bone healing.


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3-D printer saves toddler struggling to breathe

3-D printer saves toddler struggling to breathe | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


When Garrett Peterson was born, nurses couldn't rotate his head from side to side. Doing so made him turn blue instantly

"I will never forget seeing him for the first time like that," his mom, Natalie Peterson, said in a YouTube video posted by University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital. "That was hard."

Garrett was born with tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve -- a fancy way of saying he had a hole between the lower chambers of his heart, which put extreme pressure on his lungs.

The pressure caused his airways to collapse; in essence, he was trying to breathe through tiny slits. This condition is called severe tracheobronchomalacia.

The Petersons and their son, Garrett, before his surgery.

"In some ways the heart defect is relatively straightforward to fix," Dr. Richard Ohye, head of pediatric cardiovascular surgery at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, said in the video. "It's the lung issues and the airway issues that are the bigger problem."

The Petersons spent months watching their son turn blue four or five times a day as hospital staff struggled to revive him, according to a university press release.

Garrett was put on a ventilator and heavy medication to prevent him from fighting the breathing tube

Then in May 2013, Garrett's father, Jake Peterson, read an article about another baby with a similar breathing problem.

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▶ Baby Heart Patient Saved by 3D Printing - YouTube

Video Transcrip: Hospital officials at the Kosair Children's Hospital have stated that 3D printing was used to support an infant pediatric heart patient for the first time recently. Doctors operating on baby Rolande, a 14-month-old with heart defects studied a three dimensional replica of the child's heart to aid successful surgery outcomes. The infant's heart was riddled with defects before the surgery at the Hospital and his surgeon, Dr. Erle Austin, said that he had anticipated that the surgery would be tricky and thus sought a model that offered more detail than traditional 2D scans.

Dr. Austin's team contacted the University of Louisville J.B. Speed School of Engineering, which used a 3D printer to create a polymer model of the heart to provide vital insight ahead of the planned surgery.

Once he had a model, it was clear what needed to be done and how he could do it. The Cardiothoracic surgeon was able to reduce exploratory incisions, reduce overall operating time and also even ensure that Roland would not require any sequential or consequential follow-up operations for this relatively high-risk surgery.

Roland, the son of Par Tha Sung and Sang Ceu Lian of Owensboro, Kentucky, U.S.A., was born with heart problems that included a hole in his heart, as well as misaligned aorta and pulmonary arteries, which, if left untreated, would have been fatal.

The engineering team behind this wonderful application of 3D printing created the model and end-use 3D print in just 20 hours on a MakerBot Replicator 2X desktop 3D printer.
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Jake Cumner's curator insight, March 10, 2014 6:24 AM

Reminded me of a blog I wrote less than 12 months ago.  At the time I priced 3d printers at between $20-50k each.  Just checked out prices again and they are down to  a reasonalbe price of $1299.

Arthur Charles Smith's curator insight, March 11, 2014 6:43 PM

3D priniting can be used to give surgeons and 3D perspective. 3D priniting was able to save a 14 month old child. Because of the various applications, 3D priniting could possibly be one of the  most importanat technologies of the 21st century.

Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, September 1, 2014 1:47 AM

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Scientist says we could soon ’3D print’ alien DNA from Mars | B3dgeable

Scientist says we could soon ’3D print’ alien DNA from Mars | B3dgeable | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

Craig Venter loves the idea of 3D printing robots which can print new life forms. Venter led the private-sector’s mapping of the human genome and created the world’s first synthetic life form in 2010, a bacterium genome, artificially built from the basic building blocks of DNA and transplanted into another cell. In his new book “Life at the Speed of Light: From the Double Helix to the Dawn of Digital Life“, Venter outlines his predictions and ideas about a future in which digital design and manufacture would make it possible to effectively ‘print’ tailor-made organisms that could be used in everything from curing disease to extending human life.

“The day is not far off when we will be able to send a robotically controlled genome-sequencing unit in a probe to other planets to read the DNA sequence of any alien microbe life that may be there,” claims Venter.

He and his team at the J. Craig Venter Institute in Rockville, Maryland are also building a digital-biological converter which convert biological information into digital information like a “teleporter.” “We found a way we can move proteins, viruses and single human cells at the speed of light,” he said. “We can digitize biology, send it at the speed of light and reconfigure the biology at the other end.”

Venter believes these achievements will provide us with crops that are resistant to draught and diseases and ‘artificial’ animals that could yield both food and medicines, and it will also ‘provide the potential to transform our brains and bodies, including boosts to intelligence and longevity.’ The Sunday Times reported.

One particularly intriguing area of his research covers the idea that we may be able to return DNA sequences found on Mars and reproduce them on the Earth using this technology. “I am confident that life once thrived on Mars and may well still exist there today,” Venter writes. “If we can beam them back to Earth we should be able to reconstruct their genomes. The synthetic version of a Martian genome could then be used to recreate Martian life on Earth.”

Venter has been known to test limits, in creating this organism, Venter pushed the boundaries of genetic synthesis and transfer. Venter writes: “My greatest fear is not the abuse of technology but that we will not use it at all.” A lot of research is required before scientists can mass-produce entirely synthetic organisms, but Venter believes the potential could be huge.


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Bob Rutemiller's curator insight, July 14, 2014 8:29 AM

This is the first step  in teleporting life form information.

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World News Today - 3D printing could lead to organ production

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Laboratories around the country are experimenting with three-dimensional printing technology, including the printing of human body parts and internal organs. Scientists are currently able to print flat objects like skin, but printing tubular or hollow organs like a bladder or a lung would require internal scaffolding.


The process can use stem cells from the patient as printing material for the 3D printer, but scientists still need to figure out how to print small blood vessels. RT's Sam Sacks has more on the melding of modern medicine and 3D printing.

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Claire Williams's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:31 PM

This artical shows the new up an coming medical phanominon, printing organs. When they sy that they are printing organs that is just what they mean they take live tissue and put it into a modfied printer and poof it prints an organ. the printer is modified to prting in 3D and use live tissue as ink. After the organ is printed they can use the organ as a transpant organ. The findings are still experimental but further studies are being done

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Shiners Hospital - Cleft Lip & Palate Program


Penfield Productions, Ltd.


t’s a pleasure for me to write about 3D printing because it keeps me up to speed with so many technological advancements, including those related to medical fields. Such breakthroughs are especially relevant to me. Spinal implants, surgical guides, and prosthetics — 3D printing is being used to fabricate medical solutions to treat a wide range of ailments. Another consistent driver of modern medicine is the Shriners. The Shriners did a lot for me personally, paying for neurology and orthopedics visits, braces, and my spinal fusion surgery.


Some of their doctors press on the forefront of treatments, and now they’re using 3D printing for a less invasive procedure to repair cleft lip.


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http://www.3dprinter.net/shriners-repair-cleft-lip-with-3d-printed-orthoses

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3D printing of human organs - Times LIVE

3D printing of human organs - Times LIVE | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


Latest news from South Africa, World, Politics, Entertainment and Lifestyle. The home of The Times and Sunday Times newspaper.


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3D-Printed Skull Implanted in American Patient's Head - D-brief

3D-Printed Skull Implanted in American Patient's Head - D-brief | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


There is no shortage of new and interesting uses for 3D printing technology.


This week one more has been added to the list, and it's pretty darn impressive: replacing 75 percent of a patient's skull with a 3D-printed implant


The skull implant was approved by the FDA last month, and the surgery itself took place on March 4, as reported by Tech News Daily.


The implant was made from a type of thermoplastic called polyetherketoneketone (PEKK). This material is moldable above a certain temperature, and returns to a solid state when it cools. Unlike most plastics, thermoplastics’ long polymer chains do not break down during the melting process.


As with all 3D printing, the process begins with a digital scan to use as a blueprint. In this case that would be a CT scan or MRI of the patient’s skull. 


Then the printer makes a new version of the skull’s missing piece, layer by layer.


The printed version mimics a real skull in many ways, but also adds detailing on the surface and edges of the implant to encourage cell growth. This can also help existing bone attach to the implant more easily.


The patient-specific products can be cranked out in about two weeks.

Patients who have suffered car accidents or head trauma would benefit from this technology, as well as those with cancerous bone tissue in the skull.


And unlike existing implants made from materials like titanium, the plastic implants are light, non-corroding and won’t set off the metal detector at the airport.


The 3D-printed implant was manufactured by a Connecticut-based company called Oxford Performance Materials.


Although the company already ships its 3D-printed implants overseas, this marks the first time such a surgery has been given the go-ahead in the U.S. In the future the company hopes to expand its production to include replacements for all kinds of bones in the body.


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9 of the Coolest Things to Ever Come Out of a 3D Printer

9 of the Coolest Things to Ever Come Out of a 3D Printer | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


The excitement and hype that has been developing around the idea of 3D printing and what it might be able to do has begun to reach near hysterical proportions over the last year or so.


More:Design and Photo gallery

http://thedeependdesign.com/9-of-the-coolest-things-to-ever-come-out-of-a-3d-printer/


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3D Printing Spinal Implants - Fabbaloo Blog - Fabbaloo - Daily News on 3D Printing

3D Printing Spinal Implants - Fabbaloo Blog - Fabbaloo - Daily News on 3D Printing | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


A new era of orthopedic surgery is taking shape at Peking University. Armed with an Electron Beam Melting (EBM) 3D printer, doctors are able to create titanium implants that fit perfectly with a patient’s body.


Over the course of the last four years, Dr. Liu Zhongjun has been using EBM 3D printing to develop new spinal implants.
During that time he’s created dozens of orthopedic implants each of which has been custom designed to fit each patient’s body.

We started clinical trials on 3D printed implants late last year, and now we have used dozens of such implants for more than 50 patients," said Liu.  
In fact, according to Liu “All the [implant] patients recover very well. Nobody seems to have any undesirable side effects or adverse reaction.


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3D printers to revolutionize the medical field with printable kidneys and livers

3D printers to revolutionize the medical field with printable kidneys and livers | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


Although 3D printers have been criticized for the potential health risks associated with their use in poorly ventilated areas, we must also acknowledge the tremendous amount of good they could potentially bring to the medical field.


More :


http://www.techspot.com/news/53619-3d-printers-to-revolutionize-the-medical-field-with-printable-kidneys-and-livers.html


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Princeton scientists use 3D printer, petri dish, and cow cells to grow synthetic ear

Princeton scientists use 3D printer, petri dish, and cow cells to grow synthetic ear | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

With a 3-D printer, a petri dish and some cells from a cow,Princeton University researchers are growing synthetic ears that can receive — and transmit — sound.


The scientists send bovine cells mixed in a liquid gel through the printer, followed by tiny particles of silver.


The printer is programmed to shape the material into a “bionic ear,” and forms the silver particles into a coiled antenna.


Like any antenna, this one can pick up radio signals that the ear will interpret as sound.


The 3-D ear is not designed to replace a human one, though; the research is meant to explore a new method of combining electronics with biological material.


“What we really did here was actually more of a proof of concept of the capabilities of 3-D printing,” said Michael McAlpine, the professor who led the project. “Because most people use 3-D printing to print passive objects — things like figurines and jewelry.”


After it’s printed, the 3-D ear is soft and translucent. It is cultivated for 10 weeks, letting the cells multiply, creating a flesh color and forming hardened tissue around the antenna.


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