COOL 3DPRINTING
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COOL 3DPRINTING
All About 3d Printing!
Curated by Andre Bontems
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Finally, a 3D printing pen that actually looks like a pen

Finally, a 3D printing pen that actually looks like a pen | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it
The 3Doodler 3D printing pen received a lot of attention (not to mention $2.3 million in Kickstarter funding) last year for its potential to make 3D printing accessible to people who find a full-on desktop 3D printer expensive or intimidating. But I had my gripes with the pen: Its bulky shape made my hand cramp up after just a few minutes, taking all of the fun out of using it. There have been a flurry of copycatssince, but none have been much more ergonomic.

An upcoming 3D printer pen might finally offer a relieving alternative. The Lix, which will launch on Kickstarter on an unnamed date, is much closer to the size of an actual pen. Its body ranges from 12 mm to 14 mm wide, which is more like a marker than a pen, but still half the width of the 3Doodler.

Along with the width, the placement of the extrude buttons also appear more ergonomic. The 3Doodler’s two buttons, which can be pushed to extrude filament quickly or slowly, are awkwardly close to the bottom of the pen, hard to push and too close together. The Lix’s are farther up its body and look easier to push, although a further review will bear that out.

Its aluminum body also makes it look more like a tool than a toy; it’s attractive enough that Lix is offering a regular ballpoint pen version too.

The 3D printing pen is compatible with ABS and PLA plastic, which is fed into the top of the pen. It’s likely that Lix will sell packs of over-priced sticks of plastic to accompany the pen. It’s still not a children’s toy; the pen’s tip gets very, very hot and plastics emit fumes as they melt.

The Lix 3D printing pen will sell on Kickstarter for $70 before jumping to an estimated market price of $140. The ballpoint pen will cost $40 and then $60.

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Could Future Astronauts 3D Print Habitats Using Mars and Moon Soil?

Could Future Astronauts 3D Print Habitats Using Mars and Moon Soil? | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


Right now, there are dozens of theoretical proposals for how humans could eventually populate Mars (or the Moon),each as crazy as the next: Space elevator. Inflatables. Giant 3D printer.


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3D Printing With Iron & Tungsten - Design News

3D Printing With Iron & Tungsten - Design News | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it
3D Printing With Iron & Tungsten
Design News
The cost ratio of materials to total part cost also depends on part size: When making parts smaller than the size of the human hand, materials cost is only about 10 to 15 percent of total part cost.

Via Arnaud Bousquet
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3D Printing Robot Produces Chairs And Tables From Recycled Waste

3D Printing Robot Produces Chairs And Tables From Recycled Waste | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it



Two years ago, a Dutch student named Dirk Vander Kooij was designing furniture and preparing for his graduation project when he was inspired by an old 3D printer. 


So he got his hands on an industrial robot from a Chinese production line and reprogrammed it into a 3D printer to print furniture using recycled materials from old refrigerators."


Via Daniel Booth, ManufacturingStories, Juanjo Pina
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Mercor's curator insight, March 18, 2013 11:49 AM

Rescooped by ManufacturingStories from 3D PRINTING DEVELOPMENTS onto 3D Printing in Manufacturing Today

Jake Sieben's curator insight, March 22, 2013 9:00 AM

This article shows how 3D printing can be used to make practical things, such as chairs, out of recycled materials.

Chandan Gupta's curator insight, March 31, 2013 10:42 PM

The thing is why just not getting more than it. More and more things could be produced by it.

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This 3D Printing Pen Lets You Draw Sculptures in Midair

This 3D Printing Pen Lets You Draw Sculptures in Midair | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

The advent of 3D printing introduced the convenience of quickly making designs a reality, and one company is bringing this creative ease to your fingertips. 3Doodler, dubbed the "world's first 3D printing pen," lets you draw three-dimensional structures in midair.

 

3Doodler Video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=DQWyhezIze4

 

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3D printing used to create a basement laboratory on the cheap

3D printing used to create a basement laboratory on the cheap | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


With Open Source Lab, you can print expensive items for just a few dollars. You can, Pearce claims, build up a $15,000 lab for $500 flat.

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Elon Musk shows off Iron Man-style rocket design with gestures and 3D printing (video)

Elon Musk shows off Iron Man-style rocket design with gestures and 3D printing (video) | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it
In another confirmation that Elon Musk lives life differently from the rest of us, he's just posted a new SpaceX video that's straight out of a sci-fi

Via Tiaan Jonker
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Can't get my love together (extended version) - Jem & the holograms


My sixth "Jem & the holograms" videoclip ^^... this time, about the complicated relationship between Jerrica/Jem - Rio... (well, in my opinion, she must to break down with him!


Enjoy it!

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How 3D Printing Gave This Man His Life (and Face) Back

How 3D Printing Gave This Man His Life (and Face) Back | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it


How 3D Printing Gave This Man His Life (and Face) Back by Gizmodo UK.


While doctors have experimented with 3D-printed prosthetics in the past, none has been quite as prominent or incredibly detailed as Eric Moger's newest add .

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This Amazing 3-D Desktop Was Born at Microsoft

This Amazing 3-D Desktop Was Born at Microsoft | COOL 3DPRINTING | Scoop.it

 

LONG BEACH, California – The history of computer revolutions will show a logical progression from the Mac to the iPad to something like this SpaceTop 3-D desktop, if computer genius Jinha Lee has anything to say about it.

 

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology grad student earned some notice last year for the ZeroN, a levitating 3-D ball that can record and replay how it is moved around by a user.

 

Now, following an internship at Microsoft Applied Science and some time off from MIT, Lee is unveiling his latest digital 3-D environment, a three-dimensional computer interface that allows a user to “reach inside” a computer screen and grab web pages, documents, and videos like real-world objects.

 

More advanced tasks can be triggered with hand gestures. The system is powered by a transparent LED display and a system of two cameras, one tracking the users’ gestures and the other watching her eyes to assess gaze and adjust the perspective on the projection.


Click to enlarge. Image via TED

Lee’s new 3-D desktop, which he just showed off at the annual TED conference in Long Beach, California, is still in the early stages. But it lights the way toward the sort of quantum leap that’s all too rare in computer interfaces.

 

It took decades to get from the command-line interface to the graphical user interface and Apple’s Macintosh.

 

It took decades more to get from the Mac to the touch interface of iPhones and iPads.

 

 Lee and people like him might just get us to the next revolution sooner.


Others are working along similar lines. Gesture-based control has been incorporated into Microsoft’s Kinect, Samsung’s Smart TV platform, and products from startups like Leap Motion and SoftKinect (not to mention in cinema fantasyland ).

 

Three dimensional display interfaces, meanwhile, have been brewing at the University of Iowa (home to “Leonar3Do” ), in the Kickstarter gaming sensation Oculus Rift.

 

“Programming the world will alter even our daily physical activities.”
 

Lee’s SpaceTop weaves these two threads together, joining 3-D interface with 3-D gesture controls, a smart convergence that will likely become more common. In his talk, Lee said SpaceTop and ZeroN, which he also demonstrated, are part of a broader shift toward interfaces we can grab with our hands.

 

Humans seem to prefer collaborating via physical interfaces; think of a scale model, map, or whiteboard. People also like interacting in multiple modalities; think of reading a book, underlining words and scribbling in the margins in pencil, and taking separate notes on a pad.

 

Today’s computers allow none of this, flattening all interaction onto a single screen.

 

“If you somehow allow computers to accept different types of modalities in the same workflow, that will be much more effective,” Lee said in an interview. “Physical activities like how you dance an how you play sports – there will be some sort of digital aid in there.”

 

At TED, Lee showed SpaceTop and ZeroN alongside a collapsible pen that can be pushed “inside” a computer display; as the pen folds into itself, the monitor shows the end of a pen moving deeper and deeper into the display. He also showed a video of a smartphone app that, when paired with augmented reality goggles, would allow the user to “try on” a virtual watch from an online store before ordering the real thing.

 

The common thread between these systems, Lee says, is that they bring the physical world and digital world much closer together, allowing automated physical interaction he refers to as “programming the world.”


“Programming the world will alter even our daily physical activities,” he told the crowd. “With our two hands we’re reaching into the digital world.”

 

It’s not clear whether this type of user experience will remain stuck in a niche – embraced chiefly by say architects, geneticists and other 3-D designers and researchers – or whether it has the potential to go mainstream.

 

People are used to gently flicking computer mice and grazing keyboards and tablet screens; do they really have the stamina to reach into their computers and flail their arms around?

 

Lee thinks so. He says he’s not looking to replace lazy interfaces for activities like writing email or consuming video.

 

But 3-D interaction makes sense for certain uses cases – collaboration, design, and potential new activities Lee envisions like trying on virtual clothes.

 

Much of the success of systems like SpaceTop and ZeroN will ride on the details, like how much space the user must traverse and when a 3-D interface is suggested to the user.

 

That’s why this technology deserves attention from companies that can be smart about refining it, like Microsoft, or even Apple, which popularized the computer tablet after such devices had been languishing in obscurity.

 

 For now, 3-D computing seems to be off to a good start in Lee’s careful hands.

“It shouldn’t be in the hands of scientists, it should be in the hands of normal people,” Lee says. “It’s really important to have that eye when we think about what we want to do with this to design a beautiful world.

 

 It could be anything when the power of digital escapes the screen but it’s really our responsibility to design this together.”

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